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298
Lot No. 298
Estimate  11,000 - 18,000 €
This is a lot of a former auction!

John Arnold, London, Invt. et Fecit

, Movement No. 63/364, 52 mm, 142 g, circa 1783

An extremely rare, important Arnold chronometer - "of the second kind" - with "OZ-balance" by John Arnold


Case: silver. Dial: enamel. Movm.: full plate movement, chain/fusee, OZ-balance, freesprung helical gold balance spring, chatoned diamond endstone on balance.

Dial and movement of this watch are in excellent original condition. Like many other chronometers by Arnold this one too was fitted in a more modern and very solid case in the 1850s. The fact that so much effort was made for the preservation of John Arnold’s precision movements indicates the respect and reverence his creations were held in.


John Arnold (1736-1799)
After his apprenticeship with his father in Cornwall, John Arnold settled in London in 1760. In 1764 he presented King George III with a half quarter repeating cylinder watch mounted in a ring. By the time he was 28, Arnold's watches, be they verge or cylinder, displayed interesting original components such as straight-line compensation curbs and minute repeating by increments of 10 minutes (instead of the more common 15 minutes). Around 1768 Arnold began his research into marine chronometers. He established himself at 2 Adam Street, Adelphi Buildings, Strand, in 1771 and carried out most of his research into marine chronometers here over the next eleven years. By 1774 Arnold had constructed a marine chronometer with pivoted detents; he invented terminal curves for the cylindrical balance spring in 1776 and included this construction in the patent for a bimetallic compensated balance he took out in 1782. He subsequently devised numerous different balances such as the Double T, Double S, Z, O-Z and U. Arnold, who was admitted to the Clockmakers' Company in 1783, was the first to employ the term chronometer in the modern sense and to successfully find a way to simplify Harrison's timekeeper design. In 1787 he took his son, John Roger Arnold, into partnership and changed the business name to "Arnold & Son", which it retained until his death.
#43314
Case: very good, slightly worn
Dial: very good, hairlines
Movm.: very good, capable of running, cleaning recommended


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